Wind Power Setting New Records in Asia

by John Brian Shannon.

Global Wind Power Capacity Set to Rise

In recent years, about 100,000 MegaWatts (MW) of wind power have been installed every three years, globally. As wind turbine technology and production facilities have ramped up, turbine costs have fallen significantly — resulting in a predictable demand curve.

The U.S. and China are by far, the world’s major players, with Germany, Spain, and Japan holding respectable positions in capacity and in turbine technology. As China entered the game, their massive manufacturing sector went into overdrive to meet expected demand. Some countries, (like the Netherlands) licensed their advanced turbine technology to China which worked to further speed production and installations inside the Middle Kingdom.

Huge increases in turbine supply, have resulted in huge increases in installations. The supply/demand result displays brilliantly in the chart below.

World Cumulative Installed Wind Power Capacity 1980-2012
World Cumulative Installed Capacity 1980-2012. Image courtesy of the Earth Policy Institute.

Looking at the chart, is there any doubt that the brisk pace of turbine installations will continue? Barring localized disruptions due to changing regulations or lowering of regional subsidy schemes, it looks like 100,000 MW will be added to the world grid every three years until 2020 at the very least.

Wind Power Ready for Takeoff in Asia

A recent Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) report informs us that 2013 was a relatively ‘slow year’ for turbine installations with only 12.5% global growth over 2012 numbers. Most of the blame for this rests on the ‘on again — off again’ uncertainty surrounding the expiration of the PTC (Production Tax Credit) in the U.S. which was responsible for severely limiting the number and size of installations in that country.

Except for America, most of the world saw growth in turbine installations for 2013. China, especially, took off at a full gallop,beginning 2013 with 75,324MW of installed wind power and adding another 16,100MW by Jan 1, 2014 – amounting to almost half all new wind power installations worldwide! Installed capacity in China now totals 91,424MW leading the GWEC to speculate the country’s wind industry may be entering a new phase of maturity.”

China has embarked on the greatest push for renewable energy the world has ever seen. A key element involves more than doubling the number of wind turbines in the next six years. Already the world’s largest producer of wind power, China plans further massive increases. From a current installed capacity of 75 GigaWatts the aim is to achieve a staggering 200 GigaWatts of installed wind power by 2020.” — BBC

Wind surpasses Nuclear in China in 2013

At 2% of total electrical power generation in China wind surpassed nuclear (1.2%) last year, to become the country’s third-largest generator of electricity, after fossil fuels (all fossil fuels together total 78.2%) and hydro-electric (18.5%).

By 2020, even accounting for the growth of all other kinds of energy in China, it will represent 4% of total electrical generation. Which doesn’t sound like much, but it is a staggering number in itself, especially when compared to the rest of the world’s turbine installations combined!

What can renewable energy investors expect 2014-2020?

Plenty of growth for one thing. Better turbine technology and enhanced reliability, for another. More focus on so-called ‘wind corridors’ — those areas within a country’s boundaries where it happens to be most advantageous to place each turbine — yet close enough to electrical demand centres to be economical. Dramatically increased efficiency due to placing the turbine unit atop taller towers in the 200-300m range. Falling turbine prices will continue, courtesy of the massive entry into the global turbine market by China. And, turbine technology improvements and installations will continue at a rapid pace within China, and at a steady pace globally.

Perhaps the final word on the state of the industry in 2014 should go to David Shukman, the BBC’s science editor: “If any country can industrialise wind power and make it pay, it’s China.”

Published by

John Brian

Editorial Board at kleef&co. Published by the UNDP.