China to Invest $360 billion in Green Energy by 2020

China will invest $360 billion into renewable power projects by 2020 as the world’s largest consumer of energy starts to move away from coal.

China wind power
China wind power China to invest 2.5 trillion yuan in renewable power projects by 2020 as the world’s largest consumer of energy moves away from fossil fuel. Image courtesy of Newsweek.

The National Energy Administration (NEA) said Thursday that the investment would help create more than 13 million jobs in the industry, Reuters reported… Continue reading China to Invest $360 billion in Green Energy by 2020

WWF report: China can shift to 80% Renewables by 2050

by Guest Contributor: Chris Conner.
Originally published on World Wildlife Fund.

By embracing conservation measures and renewable energy, China can transition to an 80 percent renewable electric power system by 2050 at far less cost than continuing to rely on coal, according to a new report from World Wildlife Fund (WWF).

As a result, China’s carbon emissions from power generation could be 90 percent less than currently projected levels in 2050 without compromising the reliability of the electric grid or slowing economic growth.

Image Credit: China Solar Cells via Wikimedia Commons.

The future of renewable power is solar power in the distributed energy scenario. China Solar Cells Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons.

The China’s Future Generation report was prepared by the Energy Transition Research Institute (Entri) for WWF and uses robust computer modeling to simulate four scenarios based on today’s proven technology: a Baseline, High Efficiency, High Renewables, and Low-Carbon Mix scenario.

To develop its findings, Entri examined China’s electricity supply and demand on an hour-by-hour basis through 2050 using its advanced China Grid Model forecasting system.

“By fully embracing energy conservation, efficiency and renewables, China has the potential to demonstrate to the world that economic growth is possible while sharply reducing the emissions that drive unhealthy air pollution and climate change,” said WWF’s China Climate and Energy Program Director Lunyan Lu.

“This research shows that with strong political will, China can prosper while eliminating coal from its power mix within the next 30 years.”

In addition to ramping up development of renewable power sources, the world’s most populous and energy-hungry nation will need to simultaneously pursue aggressive energy efficiency initiatives to reduce electricity demand.

These efficiencies, including bold standards for appliances and industrial equipment, can reduce annual power consumption in 2050 by almost half, which would set the gold standard for these products globally and make the shift to a renewables-based power system possible.

“This research allows Chinese leaders to put the questions of technical feasibility aside and economic viability aside. Instead, it is time to focus on how to enact the right policies and establish the right institutions to ensure that China’s citizens and economy are receiving clean, renewable electricity,” said Lu. “The report shows that today’s technology can get China within striking distance of WWF’s vision of a future powered solely by renewable energy.”

The analysis also describes recent Chinese regulatory efforts and challenges to increasing the percentage of renewable electricity in the country, while providing a set of targeted recommendations for Chinese leaders and policy makers on energy efficiency, prioritizing low-carbon electricity supply investments, allowing price changes to reflect the true cost of service, and prioritizing collection and analysis of key power usage data.

“Both China and the United States are at a crossroads where leaders need to choose between a future where healthy communities are powered by clean, renewable energy or a future darkened by air pollution and the dangerous effects of climate change.

This year, as all countries develop new national climate targets in advance of talks in Paris, our leaders need to choose that brighter future.

For Chinese leaders the choice is simple. This report shows that renewables are doable. China can meet bold new targets with today’s technologies while cutting energy costs.” — Lou Leonard, WWF’s US vice president for climate change.

China Opens A Window of Opportunity 2014-2020

by John Brian Shannon.

Three Decades of GDP Growth

After three full decades of impressive GDP numbers, China’s strong growth looks set to continue until the end of the decade.

Never in history has any country accomplished such staggering GDP growth numbers, modernized its infrastructure, oriented its political structures to accept a minimal degree of capitalism, and carry the demands of 1.35 billion people.

Let’s take a look at China’s 1979-2013 GDP numbers.

China GDP growth 1979-2013. Image courtesy of the IMF.

China is now enjoying stable growth rates. In short, as China’s economy has matured, it has successfully transitioned from a Frontier economy to an Emerging economy — and with plenty of momentum in hand, has settled-in to the long-term task of building a Developed economy.

For those willing to engage with China there is the potential for substantial reward, and as in any emerging economy, an element of risk is associated with investing there. In the case of investment or corporate relocation to China, responsible leaders and individual investors alike, are wise to seek the guidance from experienced professionals as they navigate several cultures and languages and the various levels and departments of a (still) communist government.

Focus on Planning

Fortunately, statist economies like China’s are centrally-planned in five year cycles, and for the most part these five year plans are released, translated, and then published by the media.

For one example of China’s long-range planning, in this case regarding China’s aggressive energy, renewable energy and conservation policies, please see: CHINA – Atmospheric Pollution Prevention Action Plan – State Council on the issuance of air pollution control action plan notification – Guo Fa 2013, No.37 [English Translation]

For a summary of that official document, please see: China’s new Atmospheric Pollution Prevention Action Plan

Addressing the Source

One of China’s most pressing problems is the quality of life for her citizens, the absence of which can affect overall citizen satisfaction and even worker productivity.

The poor air quality in China, which reportedly leads to 410,000 premature worker deaths per year, has been addressed with a huge push towards renewable energy. The Common Language Project (clpmag.org) provides a telling snapshot:

“China faces a number of serious environmental issues caused by overpopulation and rapid industrial growth.

Water pollution and a resulting shortage of drinking water is one such issue, as is air pollution caused by an over-reliance on coal as fuel.

It has been estimated that 410,000 Chinese die as a result of pollution each year.

Deforestation and desertification are also issues and an estimated one-fifth of agricultural land since 1949 has been lost to soil erosion and economic development. The country is also host to the trade of endangered species. The country’s rivers constitute the largest potential source of hydropower in the world.

Since 2007, China has stepped up government efforts to work toward environmental sustainability by holding local officials to national standards, publishing national climate change policies and establishing groups on climate change.” — clpmag.org

Measurable Results

To say China’s leadership has posted an aggressive response to air pollution, water pollution, soil contamination and the follow-on effects on citizen health and the economic costs of widespread pollution is a verifiable understatement.

In only a few years, China has surpassed wind and solar PV leaders Germany and the U.S. in the production and installation of wind turbines and solar panels and increased energy efficiency.

Announced in July of 2013, China’s National Energy Administration told the media that they expected to install 10 GW of solar by year end of 2013, another 10 GW of solar to be installed in year 2014, and yet another 10 GW of solar to be installed in year 2015.

While many nations were installing mere MegaWatts (MW) of solar or wind power in an effort to ‘look green’ — China’s energy officials said that although they had planned to install 10 GW of solar power in 2013, China may have surpassed that target by a full 4 GigaWatts for a grand total of 14 GW of solar installed in year 2013!

It was later announced that 12 GW would be installed in year 2014, and it has been reset once more to 14 GW of solar PV power to be installed in year 2014.

The latest pollution reduction measures announced in China now point to increased spending on energy efficiency and a commitment to the installation of 14 GW of solar panels in 2013 (already done), another 14 GW in year 2014 (in progress) and yet another 14 GW for 2015.

Now that’s an active pollution management file.

Energy news is never boring in China — so stay tuned!