China to add 100,000 Public EV Charger Units in 2017

China to Fast-Forward EV Charging Installations to Combat Historic Air Pollution Levels

To combat the air pollution in China’s rapidly-growing cities, the Chinese government operating in conjunction with China’s big-city mayors, are making rapid progress towards Electric Vehicle infrastructure in an attempt to roll back historic pollution levels and consequential high healthcare costs.

In addition to the existing fleet of 150,000 public Electric Vehicle (EV) chargers operating in China in 2016, China plans to add 100,000 more public charging units, for a total of 250,000 units by the end of 2017.

These units are in addition to the 900,000 private Electric Vehicle charging units that will be installed in China by January 1st, 2018, for a grand total of 1,250,000 individual EV chargers, made up of public and private charging locations across the country.

 China EV charging station in Xiangyang, Hubai province. Image courtesy of VCG - China Daily

China EV charging station in Xiangyang, Hubai province, Jan 4, 2017. Image courtesy of VCG – China Daily

A comprehensive electric vehicle powering grid will be rolled out in major Chinese cities including Beijing, Shanghai, and Shenzhen. The country’s energy planner on Thursday vowed to further expand its public fast-charge networks to enable users to power… Continue reading China to add 100,000 Public EV Charger Units in 2017

Norway EV Sales Hit 23% of all New Car Sales

Norway Electric Car Sales = 23% Of The Market (Again)

The numbers for Norway EV sales are “in.” Official numbers are not provided for several models that share a base name with gasmobiles, so José Pontes has made estimates for them and we’ll just have to go with his numbers. Why a country with such a developed electric car market won’t break out their numbers… Continue reading Norway EV Sales Hit 23% of all New Car Sales

U.S. World Leader In Clean Energy, Electric Vehicles

America Leads World In Clean Energy, Electric Vehicles, and High Energy Consumption

The U.S. leads the world in investment in Electric Vehicles (EV) and clean energy Next 10 Green Innovation Index, International Edition for the first time analyzes and ranks the economic and energy performance of the world’s 50 largest greenhouse gas emitting nations.

While the U.S. ranks high in investment in clean energy and electric vehicle ownership, it… Continue reading U.S. World Leader In Clean Energy, Electric Vehicles

Electric Vehicles 2015 – Prices, Efficiency, Range, Pics, More

Originally published at EVobsession by Zachary Shahan.

Electric Vehicles 2015

The following are electric cars that are for sale today in the US or are supposed to be for sale at some point in 2015.

The first prices listed are base prices before the federal tax credit, and in parenthesis are prices after the federal tax credit (normally $7,500, but often less than that if the cars aren’t 100% electric cars).

Other tax credits and rebates potentially available in your city or state (such as the $2,500 California EV rebate or $5,000 Georgia EV tax credit) are not included.

Range and MPGe/MPG data come from the EPA.

Check these electric cars out and go test drive some this weekend!

BMW i3 100% electric or REx with 81 miles/130 km range. Priced at $33,850-41,350. Seats 4.124 MPGe
BMW i3 100% electric vehicle with 81 miles/130 km of range. Seats 4. Priced at $33,850-41,350. 124 MPGe

BMW i3

The BMW i3 is BMW’s first 100%-electric car built electric from the ground up. It is part of BMW’s “born electric” i series. It’s price puts it somewhat in the middle of the Nissan Leaf and the Tesla Model S.

Despite looking a bit bulky, the BMW i3 is the lightest electric car on the market, thanks to its carbon fiber body. It’s a smooth & sweet drive. Compared to BMW’s overall sales, the i3 is selling very well, making it clear that BMW is one of the auto-manufacturing pioneers in the electric vehicle space. Read my full BMW i3 review here.

Chevy Spark EV 100% electric 82 miles (132 km) $19,995-27,495 7.2 seconds 4 seats 119 MPGe
Chevy Spark EV 100% electric vehicle with 82 miles/132 km of range. Seats 4. Priced at $19,995-27,495. 119 MPGe

Chevy Spark EV

The Chevy Spark EV is a low-priced 100%-electric car that has gotten good reviews (compared to its gasoline cousin, that is) but is only available in a few markets. The Chevy Spark EV was the first car on the market that could use the SAE Combo Fast Charging system.

Ford Focus Electric 100% electric 76 miles 122 kn $21,670-29,170 10.1 seconds 5 seats 105 MPGe
Ford Focus Electric 100% electric vehicle with 76 miles/122 km of range. Seats 5. Priced at $21,670-29,170. 105 MPGe

Ford Focus Electric

The Ford Focus Electric is Ford’s only 100%-electric car has long been overpriced and simply unable to compete with competitors like the Nissan Leaf. It has long been priced considerably higher than the Nissan Leaf — which is also more widely available — but Ford finally knocked the price down by several thousand dollars in recent months… but with very little broadcasting of the price drop. Needless to say, it still isn’t selling nearly as well as the Leaf.

Fiat 500e 100% electric 87 miles 140 km $24,800-32,300 8.7 seconds 4 seats 115 MPGe
Fiat 500e 100% electric vehicle with 87 miles/140 km of range. Seats 4. Priced at $24,800-32,300. 115 MPGe

Fiat 500e

The Fiat 500e has gotten great reviews. However, the head of Fiat apparently hates electric cars (I know, crazy) and is only producing the 500e in extremely limited quantities for a couple of states (basically, because it has to in order to sell cars in California).

Hopefully the cute electric car will someday soon be available to a broader market. With its relatively low price, good reviews, and cool styling, it could give some of the top-selling electric cars on the market a run for their market.

Kia Soul EV 100% electric vehicle with 93 miles/150 km of range. Seats 5. Priced at $26,200-33,700.  105 MPGe
Kia Soul EV 100% electric vehicle with 93 miles/150 km of range. Seats 5. Priced at $26,200-33,700. 105 MPGe

Kia Soul EV

The Kia Soul EV is a snazzy electric vehicle with a bit more space on the inside than the average car, and a clear youngster appeal. With good specs and a decent price, the Soul EV could sell well… if Kia really tries to sell it.

Mercedes-Benz B-Class Electric 100% electric vehicle with 84 miles/135 km of range. Seats 5. Priced at $33,950-41,450. 84 MPGe
Mercedes-Benz B-Class Electric 100% electric vehicle with 84 miles/135 km of range. Seats 5. Priced at $33,950-41,450. 84 MPGe

Mercedes-Benz B-Class Electric

The Mercedes-Benz B-Class Electric is an extremely close competitor to the BMW i3, and is a first-offering from Mercedes in this department. It has Tesla’s interior, and reviewers have been split between it and the BMW i3, with some preferring the i3 and some preferring the B-Class Electric. One of my friends recently bought the B-Class Electric and reviewed it for us here.

Mitsubishi i 100% electric 62 miles 100 km $15,495-22,995 0-100 13.5 seconds 4 seats 112 MPGe
Mitsubishi i 100% electric vehicle with 62 miles/100 km of range. Seats 4. Priced at $15,495-22,995. 112 MPGe

Mitsubishi i

The Mitsubishi i (aka Mitsubishi i-MiEV) is one of the most basic electric cars on the market, but also one of the cheapest. As noted below, the Citröen C-Zero, Peugeot iOn, and Mitsubishi i all have essentially the same design but serve different markets.

Nissan LEAF 100% electric 84 miles 135 km $21,510-29,010 10.2 seconds 5 seats 114 MPHe
Nissan LEAF 100% electric vehicle with 84 miles/135 km of range. Seats 5. Priced at $21,510-29,010. 114 MPGe

Nissan LEAF

The Nissan Leaf is seemingly the most competitive electric car on the market. It is the world’s best-selling electric car, and sales have only been increasing (thanks to falling prices and word of mouth). After test driving several EVs myself, I have to say that it would be hard to beat the Nissan Leaf for the money… unless you have enough money to dump on a higher-end EV, like the Tesla Model S, Mercedes-Benz B-Class Electric, or BMW i3. Read my full Nissan Leaf review here.

Renault Twizy 100% electric 50 miles 80 km $12,490 on eBay Top speed = 50 mph 80 kmh
The Renault Twizy is a 100% electric vehicle with 50 miles/80 km of range Seats 2. Priced at $12,490 (on eBay) Top speed of 50 mph/80 kmh

Renault Twizy

The Renault Twizy is a cute and fun little two-seater that comes in at a super affordable price. With just two seats, it’s clearly not a “family car,” but it is a ton of fun to drive and very adequate for most driving needs.

Despite (or because of) its small size, the Twizy was the 10th-best-selling electric car in Europe and 15th-best-selling electric car in the world in 2013.

It’s really a blast to drive. I’d recommend it. Read my full Twizy review here.

Smart Electric Drive 100% electric 68 miles (109 km) $25,000, or $19,990 + $80/month battery rental ($17,500, or $12,490 + $80/month) 9.8 seconds 2 seats 107 MPGe
Smart Electric Drive 100% electric vehicle with 68 miles/109 km of range. Seats 2. Priced at $25,000 ($19,990 + $80/month battery rental) or $17,500, ($12,490 + $80/month) 107 MPGe

Smart Electric Drive

The smart electric drive could be the cheapest electric car on the US market… if you don’t own or lease it for very long.

However, due to an $80/month battery rental, the price rises to about the same as a 2014 Mitsubishi i within 3 years (note that the Mitsubishi i seats 4, while the smart electric drive seats two). Within about 6 years, the smart electric drive is about the same price as a 5-seat and much more plush Nissan Leaf.

In my personal opinion, the smart electric drive is a hard sell — unless you really want a tiny car or only want it for 2 to 3 years. Read my review of the smart electric drive here or the review of an owner who sold his Camaro for the smart electric drive here.

TESLA Model S 100% electric with 208-270 miles/335 km-435 km range -- depending on the battery option selected. Priced at $54,570-71,070 depending on battery option 5-7 seats 95 MPGe
TESLA Model S is a 100% awesome electric vehicle with 208-270 miles/335 km-435 km of range — depending on the battery option selected. Seats 5-7. Priced at $54,570-71,070 depending on options. 95 MPGe

Tesla Model S

The Tesla Model S is widely regarded as not just the best electric car on the market, but the best car of any type on the mass market (see here, here, here, here, and here for just a few examples).

So, for many people, if they can afford a $70,000–$120,000 car, the Model S is as good as it gets.

This car has flipped the electric car and overall auto world on its head in many respects.

It is a top-selling luxury/performance car, and it was the 2nd- or 3rd-best-selling electric car worldwide in 2013, despite its high price tag. All the while, it was production-limited rather than demand-limited.

Volkswagen e-Golf 100% electric with 83 miles/134 km range. Priced at $27,945-35,445. Seats 5. 116 MPGe
Volkswagen e-Golf 100% electric vehicle with 83 miles/134 km range. Seats 5. Priced at $27,945-35,445 and €34,900 in Germany. 116 MPGe

Volkswagen e-Golf

The Volkswagen e-Golf is VW’s second electric car, following close behind the VW e-Up! Clearly, it’s an electric version of VW’s extremely popular Golf model.

The e-Golf is one of the closest competitors to the world-leading Nissan LEAF, so it could potentially see very big sales numbers. However, its significantly higher price is certainly keeping sales down a lot, so VW will have to change that if it actually wants to sell this car. Read our VW e-Golf review here.

Hybrid Vehicles

BMW i8 PHEV Plug-in Hybrid with 15 miles/24 km of battery-only range. Priced at $131,907-135,700. Seats 4. 76 MPGe
BMW i8 PHEV Plug-in Hybrid with 15 miles/24 km of battery-only range. Seats 4. Priced at $131,907-135,700. 76 MPGe

BMW i8

The BMW i8 is BMW’s second i-series car. It’s one of the most expensive cars on the market — actually, the most expensive on the mass market today.

It comes with a ton of style and great acceleration (0 to 60 mph in 4.4 seconds only trails the Tesla Model S P85D’s 3.2 seconds amongst electric cars). It’s hard not to covet this beauty.

Cadillac ELR PHEV Plug-in Hybrid with 37 miles/60 km range. Priced at $67,500-75,000. Seats 4. 82 MPGe on battery; 31 MPG on gas
Cadillac ELR PHEV Plug-in Hybrid with 37 miles/60 km of battery-only range. Seats 4. Priced at $67,500-75,000. 82 MPGe on battery; 31 MPG on gas

Cadillac ELR

The Cadillac ELR is a high-end, luxury, plug-in hybrid electric car that hit the market at the very end of 2013. In many respects, it is essentially a more luxurious Chevy Volt.

It is pretty. Though, its high price was hard to justify compared to other options on the table, so you can now find the car for a price much below its MSRP… as in, cuts of nearly $30,000.

Chevy Volt PHEV Plug-in Hybrid 38 miles 61 km $26,845-34,345 8.8 seconds 5 seats 98 MPGe on battery; 37 MPG on gas
Chevy Volt PHEV Plug-in Hybrid with 38 miles/61 km of battery-only range. Seats 4. Priced at $26,845-34,345. 98 MPGe on battery; 37 MPG on gas

Chevy Volt Plug-in

The Chevy Volt is one of the most widely acclaimed electric cars on the market. It is the top-selling electric car in the US to date.

In 2013, it was the 2nd-best-selling electric car in the world. Volt owners are known as Voltheads and were “the happiest drivers” in the US for two years running… before the Tesla Model S arrived (as per Consumer Reports owner satisfaction surveys).

Ford C-Max Energi PHEV Plug-in Hybrid 21 miles 34 km $27,885-31,635 8.5 seconds 5 seats 100 MPGe on battery; 43 MPG on gas
Ford C-Max Energi PHEV Plug-in Hybrid with 21 miles/34 km of battery-only range. Seats 5. Priced at $27,885-31,635. 100 MPGe on battery; 43 MPG on gas

Ford C-Max Energi

One of two cars in Ford’s Energi (plug-in hybrid electric vehicle) lineup, the Ford C-Max Energi has quite good specs for someone who doesn’t drive very far on most days but wants to take very long trips fairly regularly. It’s also good for larger families, as it seats up to 5 people. Despite seating 5, it is cheaper than the Chevy Volt… until you factor in the federal tax credit.

The C-Max Energi is also the most efficient plug-in hybrid electric car on the market. As a result of all of this, the car has sold quite well. Despite only being available in the US, the C-Max Energi was the 8th-best-selling electric car in the world in 2013.

Ford Fusion Energi PHEV Plug-in Hybrid 21 miles 34 km $30,793-34,800 7.9 seconds 5 seats 100 MPGe
Ford Fusion Energi PHEV Plug-in Hybrid with 21 miles/34 km of battery-only range. Seats 5. Priced at $30,793-34,800. 100 MPGe

Ford Fusion Energi

Quite similar to the Ford C-Max Energi but with a few more bells & whistles, the Ford Fusion Energi has done quite well since its introduction in February 2013.

The Ford Fusion Energi certainly offers some competition to the Chevy Volt, the Toyota Prius Plug-in, and its sister, the C-Max Energi.

Importantly, for some people, it is larger than all three of these competitors. It has a bit less electric range than the Volt, but it has enough seats for five passengers.

(It has much more electric range than the Prius, and the same as the C-Max Energi — both of which seat 5.) And it is quite the looker.

Honda Accord PHEV Plug-in Hybrid with 13 miles/21 km range. Priced at $36,154-39,780. Seats 5. 115 MPGe on battery; 46 MPG on gas
Honda Accord PHEV Plug-in Hybrid with 13 miles/21 km of battery-only range. Seats 5. Priced at $36,154-39,780. 115 MPGe on battery; 46 MPG on gas

Honda Accord PHEV

Coming in a bit higher in price than the Chevy Volt, Toyota Prius Plug-in, Ford C-Max Energi, and Ford Fusion Energi has certainly hurt the Honda Accord Plug-in‘s sales. However, limited availability has likely had an even stronger impact on those sales.

Furthermore, having just 13 miles of electric range doesn’t particularly excite would-be electric car buyers. The good news is that the Accord Plug-in is very efficient when using the electric motor. But, yeah, this is a compliance car.

Porsche Cayenne S E-Hybrid Plug-in Hybrid with 14 miles/23 km range. Priced at $71,064-76,400. Seats 5. 47 MPGe
Porsche Cayenne S E-Hybrid Plug-in Hybrid with 14 miles/23 km of battery-only range. Seats 5. Priced at $71,064-76,400. 47 MPGe

Porsche Cayenne S E-Hybrid

Following the successful Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid (see below), Porsche launched the Cayenne S E-Hybrid at the end of 2014. The Porsche Cayenne S E-Hybrid can go from 0 to 60 mph in just 5.4 seconds, and has a top speed of 151 mph. I think “wicked” is the word for that.

Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid Plug-in Hybrid with 22 miles/35 km. Priced at $94,248-99,000. Seats 4. 50 MPGe
Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid Plug-in Hybrid with 22 miles/35 km of battery-only range.Seats 4. Priced at $94,248-99,000. 50 MPGe

Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid

The Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid is a plug-in hybrid electric sports car that is everything you’d expect — awesome. It can go from 0 to 60 miles per hour in ~5 seconds.

The Panamera S E-Hybrid now accounts for nearly 10% of all Panamera sales.

Toyota Prius PHEV Plug-in Hybrid 11 miles 18 km $27,490-29,990 10.2 seconds 5 seats 95 MPGe on battery; 50 MPG on gas
Toyota Prius PHEV Plug-in Hybrid with 11 miles/18 km of battery-only range. Seats 5. Priced at $27,490-29,990. 95 MPGe on battery; 50 MPG on gas

Toyota Prius Plug-in

The Toyota Prius Plug-in was either the 2nd- or 3rd-best-selling electric car worldwide in 2013. Unfortunately, its electric range is just 11 miles, then the gas engine kicks in. The Prius PHEV is most likely aided by the strong, high-selling Prius brand.

It mainly competes with the Chevy Volt, Ford C-Max Energi, and Ford Fusion Energi, but it has more seats than the Volt and is almost $10,000 cheaper than the Fusion Energi. So, its closest competitor is probably the Ford C-Max Energi. This seems to be a good place in the EV spectrum, as both cars have been doing quite well. Of course, the C-Max Energi has 10 more miles of electric range, almost double the Prius PHEV’s 11 miles.

Either due to the increasing competition, people simply deciding they want more electric range, or Toyota cutting supply, sales of the Prius Plug-in fell off a lot toward the end of 2014.

Basic Electric Vehicle Information

Electric vehicles (EVs) run on electricity. Some EVs run on 100% electricity, while others (hybrid electric vehicles HEVs) run partly on electricity and partly on some other fuel (e.g., gas or diesel).

Vehicles that can at times run solely on electricity, and can be plugged in to charge their batteries, are called plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). 100% electric vehicles and PHEVs are clearly much better for the environment (and thus, humans) than their gasoline-powered cousins. Their fuel (electricity) is also much cheaper.

Originally published at EVobsession by Zachary Shahan. This article is posted here with the authour’s permission.

European Electric Vehicle Sales up 79% from 2013

by John Brian Shannon John Brian Shannon

What a difference a year makes. Electric Vehicles, once a novelty in Europe, seem to have hit the mainstream. No doubt there is still plenty of room to grow as even with the latest sales increase, EV’s only make up only a tiny fraction of the annual 7 million car sales in the European Union.

Overall, EV sales in Europe are up 79% from the same time period last year, although within individual nations there are wide disparities in EV adoption.

NORWAY — Although Norway is not an EU-member-country, it is part of Europe. And the earliest adopter of electric vehicles in Europe is Norway, registering only 2373 EV sales in the first half of 2013.

Now compare that to the 9950 EV sales Norway logged in the first half of 2014. That’s a 302% increase H1 2013 to H1 2014. In a country of only 5 million people that’s a pretty significant sign that EV’s are gaining wider acceptance.

TESLA has just completed the installation of dozens of free-to-use SuperCharger stations in Norway and you can find them in almost every Norwegian city, town and hamlet. A big draw with the SuperCharger system is that a Tesla Model S can fully charge in about 30 minutes from dead flat. Of course, if you’re just ’topping-up’ your Tesla battery you may not have time to finish your latte before you’re on the road again.

Prior to the latest SuperCharger installations, it took some careful driving to drive the length of Norway and not run the battery down, but one can now drive across the entire country of Norway with hardly a thought about charging locations, all of which are easily located on the huge Tesla LED dashboard display.

The most popular EV’s in Norway are the Tesla Model S and the Nissan LEAF.

GERMANY – Posting respectable numbers but nowhere near the example set by Norway, EU-member-nation Germany has almost doubled their first half EV sales compared to the same time period in 2013. German’s bought 2382 EV’s in H1 of last year, ramping up to 4230 in H1 of this year.

United Kingdom — Another European country that is still not part of the EU, the UK registered 1168 EV’s in H1 of 2013, and in H1 of 2014 some 2570 EV’s were registered.

Both the German and UK drivers prefer the Tesla Model S, the BMWi3 and the Nissan LEAF, although the new Renault Zoe is gaining acceptance as a very affordable electric vehicle.

FRANCE – French citizens buy a lot of EV’s, but numbers were slightly down compared to last year. Still, Renault continues to add affordable new EV models to its lineup. In 2013, there must have been a lot of ‘pent-up’ EV demand, as France registered 7293 EV’s in H1 of 2013, but in H1 of this year France added only 6405 Electric Vehicles to the country’s roads.

The most popular EV’s in France are the Renault Twizy, the new Renault Zoe and the Nissan LEAF.

Electric Vehicle sales soar in Europe as petrol prices move past E1,84 per litre.
Electric Vehicle sales soar in Europe as petrol prices move past € 1,89 per litre in some jurisdictions. Image courtesy of CleanTechnica.

While some countries in the EU could not match (non-EU-member) Norway’s total EV sales, some statistically significant numbers are showing for some EU nations.

The Netherlands for one, zipped up from 437 EV sales in the first half of 2013, to 1149 units in the first half of this year. While Austria went from 252 to 709 H1 to H1 and Belgium went from a lowish 195 first half EV sales up to 629 in H1 of 2014.

As far as the top electric cars, they were the Nissan Leaf (7,109), Tesla Model S (5,330), and Renault Zoe (3,669). Tesla Model S sales were largely in Norway (over 3,000 there), while Renault Zoe sales were largely in France (over 1,600 there). – CleanTechnica.com

All in all, some respectable increases with only France as the spoiler in the Year-on-Year H1 comparison.

Here are the total registrations for H1 2013 and H1 2014.

  • TOTAL EV sales all EU countries (first half of 2013) — 15591
  • TOTAL EV sales all EU countries (first half of 2014) — 27946
  • TOTAL EV sales increase all EU countries year-on-year (first half comparison) — 79%

Even with all that good news, it’s important to remember that while EV sales are showing dramatic improvements in some European nations, electric vehicles have not yet reached 1% of new car sales.

The one bright spot, now that more EV’s are hitting the roads is that public charging stations are being installed at at phenomenal rate. The Netherlands public charging system is geared to a maximum travel distance of 65 kilometres between chargers. That puts electric vehicles on an even footing with petrol stations in the country.

And, unlike a petrol car, you can always charge your car at home or at the office just by plugging it in to an ordinary wall socket, although this slow-charging mode may take a few hours.

Another positive is that affordable new EV models are hitting showrooms, giving drivers more choices and a wider range of electric vehicles to choose from. With names like Tesla, BMW, Toyota, Nissan, Renault, Volvo, Ford and Porsche solidly behind electrified vehicles, reliability issues are non-existent.

Here are some fun facts for European residents to ponder when considering the switch from a petrol engine car to an electric vehicle.

Here are the petrol prices per litre for some selected European nations, as of August 11, 2014:

  1. Austria — € 1,35
  2. Belgium — € 1,61
  3. Denmark — € 1,71
  4. Finland — € 1,63
  5. Germany — € 1,62
  6. Netherlands — € 1,79
  7. Norway — € 1,89
  8. Portugal — € 1,62
  9. Sweden — € 1,55
  10. United Kingdom — € 1,61

To convert these per litre prices, valued in euros – into their U.S. equivalents, we can use the very rough calculation of 4 litres per US gallon (which is how petrol/gasoline is sold in the United States) and 1.33 USD to 1 euro (current as of August 11, 2014).

For the Norwegian example, we can see that 4 litres of petrol (to roughly equal 1 US gallon) will cost you 7.57 euros – and converting that to US dollars gives you $10.14 per US gallon. Many US citizens use 10 gallons of petrol (or more) every day…

In Austria 1 US gallon of petrol (rough calculation) will set you back $7.18 in US dollars.

For those who elect to charge their EV at home for about 1-3 euros per day, you will have no need to stop at a petrol station and pay up to € 1,89 per litre of petrol, times how many litres you burn per day. And it’s doubtful that petrol prices will be dropping any time soon.

Not only are EV’s pollution-free, reliable and extremely low maintenance – spending 1-3 euros per day to recharge your EV battery at home (or nothing if you charge it at a free-to-use public charging station) vs. 5-10 euros per day for petrol depending on the size of the petrol engine – can really add up over the course of a year.

I strongly suspect that 2015 EV sales numbers will greatly surpass these first impressive baby-steps taken by electric vehicle manufacturers and their customers. By 2020, it would be reasonable to expect a full 10% of new vehicle registrations to be of the electrified vehicle variety.