Did climate change collapse ancient civilizations?

Did climate change cause these ancient civilizations to collapse?

Drought is the great enemy of human civilization. Drought deprives us of the two things necessary to sustain life–food and water. When the rains stop and the soil dries up, cities die and civilizations collapse, as people abandon lands no longer able to supply them with the food and water they need to live. While the fall of a great empire is usually due to a complex set of causes, drought has often been identified as the primary culprit or a significant contributing factor in a surprising number of such collapses. Drought experts Justin Sheffield and Eric Wood of Princeton, in their 2011 book, Drought, identify more than ten civilizations, cultures and nations that probably collapsed, in part, because of drought. — Dr. Jeff Masters, writing in the Ten Civilizations or Nations That Collapsed From Drought

Climate Change
Scientists documenting the impacts of climate change say it may be a factor in the boom-and-bust cycles of ancient Southwest civilizations in the US. Cliff Palace image courtesy of wunderphotographer Amtnspirit.

 


The Ancestral Puebloan (Anasazi) culture in the Southwest U.S. in the 11th – 12th centuries AD. Beginning in 1150 AD, North America experienced a 300-year drought called the Great Drought. This drought has often been cited as a primary cause of the collapse of the ancestral Puebloan (formally called Anasazi) civilization in the Southwest U.S., and abandonment of places like the Cliff Palace at Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado. The Mississippian culture, a mound-building Native American civilization that flourished in what is now the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States, also collapsed at this time. Information courtesy of www.wunderground.com


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Silicor Materials builds new silicon factory in Iceland

Silicor Materials Builds New Silicon Factory In Iceland

Silicor Materials is a 9-year-old California company that makes the silicon used to produce solar panels. Silicon requires a lot of power to manufacture, so the cost of energy is an important factor in producing silicon profitably. Iceland has an abundance of cheap electrical power, thanks to abundant hydroelectric and geothermal resources. That has led Silicor… Continue reading Silicor Materials builds new silicon factory in Iceland

U.S. World Leader In Clean Energy, Electric Vehicles

America Leads World In Clean Energy, Electric Vehicles, and High Energy Consumption

The U.S. leads the world in investment in Electric Vehicles (EV) and clean energy Next 10 Green Innovation Index, International Edition for the first time analyzes and ranks the economic and energy performance of the world’s 50 largest greenhouse gas emitting nations.

While the U.S. ranks high in investment in clean energy and electric vehicle ownership, it… Continue reading U.S. World Leader In Clean Energy, Electric Vehicles

Net Zero Building: Bullitt Center – Seattle, Washington

Net Zero Building Case Study: Bullitt Center – Changing the Status Quo

The Bullitt Center in Seattle, Washington, is one of the most self-sufficient buildings on the planet. It is net zero energy and, after the water reuse system is approved by city authorities, it will also be classed as a net zero water building. Net zero means that the building uses the same amount as it creates or generates – it is self-sufficient. In a… Continue reading Net Zero Building: Bullitt Center – Seattle, Washington