Power the World with 100 percent Renewable Energy

Excerpt reposted from: How to Save $23 Trillion Per Year: 100% Renewable Energy for the World

by Jeff Masters | January 02, 2017

Here’s a 2017 New Year’s resolution I’d like to see the nations of the world adopt: an immediate international effort to invest in a world where 100% of our electricity will be generated by wind, water, and solar power by 2050.

Such an effort is technically and economically feasible, and has been championed by Stanford professor Mark Jacobson since 2009.

His latest research on the subject was laid out in a series of talks last month in San Francisco at the annual meeting of The American Geophysical Union—the world’s largest conference on climate change.

100 percent Renewable energy - Wind turbines in Scotland produced 106% of Scotland's power over the holiday season 2016.
Jeff Masters proposes an international effort to power the entire world by 2050 with 100 percent renewable energy, via wind, water, and solar power exclusively. Over the 2016 holiday season, wind turbines in Scotland met 106 percent of Scotland’s electricity demand. Image courtesy The National.scot

During his talks, Dr. Jacobson outlined a plan to power 139 nations of the world for all purposes—including electricity, transportation, heating/cooling, industry, and agriculture/forestry/fishing—using a mix of approximately 37% wind, 58% solar, 4% hydropower, and 1% geothermal, wave, and tidal power.

His road map to a 100 percent renewable energy future uses existing generator technologies, along with existing electrical transportation, heating/cooling, and industrial devices and appliances.

He argued that his plan… [click here to read the full article]


Renewable Energy dena Start Up Energy Transition Award - Banner_Startup_Energy_700x116px

China to Invest $360 billion in Green Energy by 2020

China will invest $360 billion into renewable power projects by 2020 as the world’s largest consumer of energy starts to move away from coal.

China wind power
China wind power China to invest 2.5 trillion yuan in renewable power projects by 2020 as the world’s largest consumer of energy moves away from fossil fuel. Image courtesy of Newsweek.

The National Energy Administration (NEA) said Thursday that the investment would help create more than 13 million jobs in the industry, Reuters reported… Continue reading China to Invest $360 billion in Green Energy by 2020

European Union to cut energy use 30% by 2030

The Big Power Plan: European Union to cut energy use by 30%

The European Commission has unveiled its big power plan, aiming to slash energy use in the bloc 30 percent by 2030.

“Europe is on the brink of a clean energy revolution. And just as we did in Paris, we can only get this right if we work together. With these proposals, we have cleared the way for more competitive, cleaner energy in Europe.” — European Commission

Cutting waste, better integrating renewable energy and phasing out subsidies for coal-fired electricity generation are all part of the vision. But wind and solar energy producers will no longer have priority for selling to the… Continue reading European Union to cut energy use 30% by 2030

Renewable Energy covers 100% of new demand in China

China covered all its new energy demand with renewable energy in 2015 – and there was still plenty left to spare

China is drawing evermore power from renewable energy. Greenpeace says the country's growth in wind and solar energy exceeded new electricity demand. Ningxia Wind Farm in northern China
China is drawing evermore power from renewable energy. Greenpeace says the country’s growth in wind and solar energy exceeded new electricity demand. Ningxia Wind Farm in northern China. Image credit Lang Rover Our Planet / Flickr

China installed half of the world’s new solar and wind capacity last year.

But the Chinese aren’t just beefing up their renewable capacity, they’re also cutting down on coal. The new clean energy power plants along with a shift away from heavy industry, mean that coal use in China has dropped over the last three years… Continue reading Renewable Energy covers 100% of new demand in China

Scotland Wind Power: 106% Electricity Demand from Wind

by John Brian Shannon

Last Sunday, in the midst of gale force winds, wind farms generated 106% of Scotland’s electricity demand. It wasn’t the first time and it won’t be the last time.

On many other occasions Scotland produces prodigious amounts of electricity via wind power and with more wind turbines being installed every year we should expect this to become a normal occurrence.

“Turbines spread across the land and in the ocean surrounding Scotland provided 39,545 megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity to the National Grid on Sunday while the country’s total power consumption for homes, business and industry was 37,202 MWh.

Scotland’s goal of generating 50% of their annual electricity from renewables is on pace to happen a full year early. Scotland also has a goal of 100% renewable electricity by 2020, but it might only get to 87% per some reports. Still – 87% over the course of a year is a powerful value and will probably mean 100% will arrive before 2025.” — Electrek

Both hydro-electric dams and wind turbines in Scotland rely on electricity storage in the form of pumped storage — water pumped back up the hill into the reservoir, allowing that energy to be harvested again.

Scotland wind power Strathdearn pumped-storage hydro scheme. Image courtesy of Scottish Scientist.
Scotland wind power Strathdearn pumped-storage hydro scheme. Image courtesy of Scottish Scientist.

During the nighttime, wind flow across both ocean and land are more constant than during the daylight hours. Conveniently, this is also when electrical demand is lower, allowing surplus electricity during those hours to pump the water back into the reservoir and ready for the sudden demand spike at 7:00am the next morning.

More pumped storage solutions are planned for Scotland as it’s convenient and (especially over the long term) affordable.

Read about Scottish plans to increase pumped storage

More offshore and onshore wind farms, more pumped storage and more hydro-electric dams means that Scotland may reach it’s goal of 50% renewable energy one year early, while the larger goal of 100% renewable energy by 2020 could take up to 2025 to achieve due to regulatory issues.

Still, that’s an amazing accomplishment by any standard. Hats off to Scotland!